Mayne Island Conservancy Society

Species Home Range Maps

Stimulated by the Islandís Trust Sensitive Ecosystems Mapping Project of 2005, the Conservancy initiated, within the Community Stewardship Project, a program of combining habitat and species information with the Sensitive Ecosystems data to develop home range maps of endemic species of local concern. These maps will enable better awareness of critical habitat requirements and species distribution on Mayne as well as enable us to better plan management strategies to maintain both the species and ecosystems that contribute so much richness to the island.


Common Name:

Pileated Woodpecker


Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Status (B.C.): No concern


Common Name:

Northern Red-legged Frog


Scientific Name: Rana aurora

Status (B.C.): Blue listed


Common Name:

Propertius Duskywing


Scientific Name: Erynnis propertius

Status (B.C.): Red listed

The Pileated Woodpecker is one of the biggest, most striking forest birds. Rivaling a crow in size it is distinguished by itís black body with bold white stripes down the neck and a flaming-red crest. These birds require mature forests with large dead trees. Pileated Woodpeckers manufacture their homes by whacking at dead trees leaving unique rectangular holes in the wood. They also create these holes while in search of their main prey, carpenter ants, These nest holes act as crucial shelter to many species including owls, ducks, bats, and pine martens.

The Northern Red-legged Frog is a medium sized brown or reddish frog, with smooth skin marked by small black "freckles." Their most distinctive trait is the red coloring on the underside of their hind legs. Northern Red-legged Frogs enjoy the cool temperatures of the coastal forests.and make their home in moist forests and wetlands, breeding in shallow ponds or shaded streams. Adult frogs spend much of their time on land, sometimes straying quite a distance from the water if the weather is damp. They can be found under logs and debris.

Propertius Dusky Wing Butterflies are brown to purplish, to dark grey, with an array of white spots across both sets of wings. Early and late phase instars(larvae) are sage green, with yellow sub-dorsal lines and rings, as well as a distinct orange spot on their heads. In Canada, the only known host plant for E. propertius' larvae is Garry oak. This species can be found from sea level to mid-elevation areas with open Garry Oak stands or mixed woodlands where Garry Oak occur.

Mayne Island map showing pileated woodpecker habitat
Pilleated Woodpecker
Mayne Island map showing red legged frog habitat
Red Legged Frog
Mayne Island map showing propertius dusky wing habitat
Propertius Duskywing

Common Name:

Red Elderberry



Scientific Name:
Sambucus racemosa

Status (BC):
No concern

Common Name:

Purple Martin



Scientific Name:
Progne subis

Status (BC):
Blue-listed

Common Name:

Western Screech Owl



Scientific Name:
Otus kennicottii kennicottii

Status (BC):
Blue-listed

This large shrub requires a combination of full to part sun with consistent moisture. Its long green leaves accompany large clusters of small white flowers, which become persistent, red, berry-like fruit. Its flowers attract native pollinators and its berries are eaten by birds and mammals. On Mayne Island this species is not common because many sites are too dry or too shaded. It is most often seen along roadsides in wet areas or in forest openings. Naturally this species would have grown in small openings in wetter parts of the forest created by fallen trees. Many of the wettest sites on Mayne where this plant would have previously been found have been developed for agriculture.

The Purple Martin is the largest North American swallow and has declined in numbers due to loss of habitat. Originally nesting in large snags and wildlife trees in woodland and freshwater areas; Purple Martin now almost all nest in human-made nest boxes placed in marine habitats. Their preferred habitat has been reduced due to logging, agriculture and fire prevention. To help them return to natural nesting habitats, it is vital that we preserve large snags and wildlife trees in woodland, freshwater, and coastal areas. Adult males are almost entirely a dark purple-black, while adult females have a greyish-white breast, with darker grey heads and necks.

Western Screech-owls are small owls with yellow eyes and tufts over their ears. Their feathers range from grey to brown and have dark wavy lines, creating a streaked appearance. Their calls include trills and have been likened to a bouncing ball. These owls have declined in numbers due to loss of habitat. They require snags or wildlife trees for nesting, many of which have been removed for logging, agriculture or development. They are not common on Mayne because of their preference for riparian areas as habitats. To help provide habitat for these owls, we need to preserve riparian areas and refrain from cutting down wildlife trees and snags.

Mayne Island map showing red elderberry habitat
Red Elderberry
Mayne Island map of Purple Martin habitat
Purple Martin
Mayne Island map of Screech Owl habitat
Screech Owl

Methodologies

A few words about how these maps were created and the source of the data is in preparation. Come back soon!

        |    About Us     |    Site Map     |    Privacy Policy     |    Contact Us     |    Disclaimer     |

©2012 Mayne Island Conservancy Society

    Top ^